[Force] [Magnets] [Friction] [Gravity and Upthrust]

Magnets are pieces of metal that attract iron

Different types of magnet

 

bar_magnet
Bar magnet

horseshoe_magnet

Horseshoe magnet

button_magnet
Button magnet

 

Every magnet has two poles

N= North seeking pole

S= South seeking pole

The poles of a magnet is where the magnetic force is the strongest.

horseshoe-magnet

Iron filings sticking to the
poles of a horseshoe magnet

 

A magnet has lines of magnetic force around it

magnet2

When we sprinkle iron filings on to a piece of paper laid over the magnet we can see the magnetic field lines

 

For a demonstration click here

mag_field lines

Rules about magnetic poles

ks2_forces_clip_image001
Poles that are different (unlike poles) attract each other
ks2_forces_clip_image001_0000
Poles that are the same (like poles) repel (push) apart

 


Which materials are attracted to a magnet?
The north pole of a magnet is brought near a variety of materials

The results are noted below:

Object made from what happens
Iron nail
Copper
Steel ruler
Wooden ruler
Pencil sharpener
Magnetic north pole
Magnet south pole
iron
copper
steel
wood
aluminium
iron
iron
attracts
does not attract
attracts
does not attract
does not attract
repels
attracts

Conclusion:
This is what we learn from this experiment:

  1. The only common material attracted to a magnet is iron
    (Steel contains iron)
  2. The only thing repelled by a magnet is another magnet
  3. Not all metals are attracted to a magnet. Only iron

 

Note: magnets are also attracted to the metals called cobalt and nickel, but you don’t need to remember that for KS2